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Evolutionary divergence between rock hyraxes and rock-wallabies  

 

wallaboboPetrogale xanthopus photo © Adam Jenkins

 

 
Rock hyraxes and rock-wallabies are adapted to extremely similar environments but could hardly differ more in their modes of locomotion. Rock hyraxes run quadrupedally by virtue of adhesive friction on precarious surfaces; instead of hugging the rock surface, rock-wallabies flee bipedally by bouncing off rocks while swinging the long tail for balance. One reason why rock hyraxes contrast with rock-wallabies in being able to squeeze their virtually tailless body into crannies is that they share their boulders and cliffs with baboons – tail-grabbing mischief-makers with no counterparts in the Australian fauna.
 
Robin and the Honey Badger, 22 March 2016

                                             

                                           

                                            

 

 

 

i.e. more intensely pigmented than the normal colour-morp


 

 

 

 

 

                                        

i.e. more intensely pigmented than the normal colour-morp
Last modified on 25 August 2016

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